Thursday, November 17, 2011

Why I Blog


"The people must know before they can act, and there's no educator to compare with the press." 

Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist and anti-lynching activist (1862-1931)

6 comments:

veganelder said...

Thank you for information about this outstanding human. I especially liked that she kept her own name when she married and good for her for going after racism in the WCTU.

Excellent, thanks again.

Brotha Wolf said...

She was an important figure in civil rights history.

Temple said...

Nice picture of Ida Wells.

Her research (over years) showed that black men who were lynched for "raping" white women were actually in consensual relationships or had been coerced into sexual relations with white women. Coerced, meaning that white women would threaten to accuse them of rape if they did not have sex with them.

On the other side of this, Rosa Parks actually began her civil rights activism as a young woman (long before her refusal to move to the back of bus) working to get white men prosecuted for the rape & gang rape of black girls & women (At the Dark End of the Street, Danielle McGuire).

Changeseeker said...

Greetings, all. Thanks for your comments. Wells-Barnett was a tireless and courageous crusader for sure. I don't know about the research you mention, Temple, but I do know that when Cox researched 3,811 "official" (acknowldged) lynchings between 1889 and 1943, he discovered that 83.5% of them had nothing whatsoever to do with sex -- period. They were the result of a Black man having an argument with a White man, quitting his job or talking another Black man into quitting his, attempting to register to vote, etc. And sometimes for no reason at all. Why am I not surprised?

Temple said...

"I don't know about the research you mention, Temple, but I do know that when Cox researched 3,811 "official" (acknowldged) lynchings between 1889 and 1943, he discovered that 83.5% of them had nothing whatsoever to do with sex -- period. They were the result of a Black man having an argument with a White man, quitting his job or talking another Black man into quitting his, attempting to register to vote, etc. And sometimes for no reason at all. Why am I not surprised?"

Thanks for your additional insight & education, Changeseeker. I want to search Cox's research soon. . .I hope (so many reads, too little time). I'm sure that you're busy & that you have a life, but have you had an opportunity to flip through "At the Dark End of the Street?"

Changeseeker said...

I've heard of it, Temple, but I haven't read it. From what the website says, though, I definitely should. Thanks for the reminder. I've added it to my "shopping list."